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Newmarket Residential Building / Smart Design Studio

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Newmarket Residential Building / Smart Design Studio

© Romello Pereira© Romello Pereira© Ross HoneysettNewmarket Residential Building / Smart Design Studio+ 19


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    17554 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2020


  • Photographs Photographs: Romello Pereira, Ross Honeysett

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Alspec, Bentley, Dekton, Carpet CE, Paco Jaanson, Parisi, Tapetti, AstraWalker taps, Caroma, Caesar’s stone, Color tile, Euroset, HDH Group, Smeg










© Romello Pereira
© Romello Pereira

Text description provided by the architects. Fig Tree Pocket is an enclave of four buildings arranged around three leafy gardens, each with a unique character and purpose. The architecture is both modern and classic, created by a limited palette coupled with an architecture of rhythm and unity. The building shapes are created with consideration of passive solar design, privacy, access to views and natural cross ventilation. They were designed in harmony with the landscape and therefore have a sober and elegant look.

© Romello Pereira
© Romello Pereira
© Romello Pereira
© Romello Pereira

The master plan for this site, a former stable and sales ice rink in Randwick, created a series of four north-south facing buildings connecting the busy Barker Road to the rear of the site where the former heritage listed stables have been built. been preserved. New tree-lined roads give addresses to each building and allow for east-west facing apartments, which, if well designed, can provide excellent solar access in winter as well as cross ventilation. Between the buildings is a new garden space, providing a visual and physical connection between the retail offerings of Barker Road and Old Stables, which is now a Randwick Council community building. In addition to the stables, the former home of the Ingles family, a listed two-story Victorian mansion, has been preserved. Given the scale of these two buildings, the shape of the proposed buildings goes from seven floors to three.

Three horizontal exposed concrete slabs run the length of the buildings, derived from the three key references of the walls of the adjacent stables and the shape of the gable roof. Juxtaposed to this is a series of vertical slats of polished precast concrete that rise to the full height of the building and flare out to the north. The slats are sculpted at the top, blending into the slatted windows, and recessed at the base where they open onto the ground floor courtyards. The openings are generous and have been connected to exterior private terraces and balconies but arranged to provide enclosure and comfort to internal spaces elsewhere, framing views of the landscaped setting or the wider surroundings. These slat walls direct the views to the north, rather than across the garden or the road. This inadvertently gives the architecture a drastically different effect when viewed from the north and south ends of the building respectively.

© Ross Honeysett
© Ross Honeysett

Prefabricated facades polished to expose the warm white aggregate inside, refer to traditional Randwick sandstone structures in a contemporary way. While the finish of the polished and out of shape concrete elements remains consistent on each building, the color of the balustrades, spandrels and window frames differs between buildings to subtly distinguish them from each other. These dark muted colors complete the feature of their appearance. Grandview’s dark green accents, for example, pair perfectly with the adjacent old fig tree, while Cambridge’s bolder eggplant fenestration complements the predominant salmon pink of old heritage stables.